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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
temperatures -- from the freezing temperatures. >> we are always colder here than in the urban environments. >> garza can't afford to lose any of these endangered plants because they contain available genetic material. >> so in an over riding way we are conserving and preserving some of the species here that may go extinct in the wild. >> nice and warm. nice and warm. >> it is just as important to protect the pets at the berkeley east bay humane society. a sweater donation program is helping the rescue center which is still recovering from a fire two years ago. >> it is going to be cold again tonight. we get them buttoned up before they go home so they are nice and warm. >> the temperature was in the low 40s, but it wasn't enough to keep people from celebrating the weekend. in this weather some things sell better than others like japanese-style hot pots. >> when it is really cold outside we just want soup. so we decided to do hot pot tonight. >> another hot item, something the employees at the ace berkeley hardware store hadn't thought of until it started flying off the shelf. >> ant bait,
out space. it's so much easier to shut down a shop than it is in this environment. the colorado version of the law makes the law enforcement side of this much more challenging. >> and so the next thing that they could do is simply repeal it. and say if you're going to crack down on our regulatory system, we'll legalize without a regulatory system, then do what you can. >> you might notice that some of the initial ones were rebellious by nature. i think marijuana users describe themselves -- some of them have a distaste for it being legal because they're now abiding with the law. if what there is is a very aggressive response you're going to tap in their rebellious spirit. >> we're seeing a breakdown of a federal relationship. michael will give us a broader context than what we're seeing. >> there is a sort of tempting federalism prospect on this which sees something along the following lines. and angela alluded to this. look, the resurgence of american federalism because states have preferences here. there's no reason. let's experiment. i don't think that's necessarily wrong. bu
they are going to be different given the political environment? >> in the past decades, cops have been marginalized, but after the revolution, cops have started to express their opinions freely. previously cops would protest inside the cathedral, but after the revolution they go outside of the state tv building. this is one of the positive goals. from my and i will try alongside all the bishops and priests to focus on the spiritual role of the church followed by the social role. therefore the political role will have no role left except to continue partisan politics. >> is it the tendency to try to pull the church out of politics? >> indeed, the church needs to remain out of politics. the church as a spiritual establishment. that is the primary role. it is also a social role to help with construction of services and schools and so on. >> banks are being allowed more flexibility in a crisis. they will have more assets that will be easier to turn to cash if they have problems. regulators still want banks to hold enough cash and assets they can sell quickly in case they run into trouble.
, a has been is missing but with children, have protection concerns in a can't environment or in an urban environment. and so we will look at that population and want to identify those, those people. sometimes people with medical conditions, they can't be treated in a camp. and makes them again more vulnerable and we will look at those populations. so it's kind of a broad array of vulnerabilities that we try to assess. >> ms. strack and, therefore, could you identify, we're talking about those who are eligible for consideration. there has been an identification of an emphasis on those who have participated in assisting the united states efforts either in the military intelligence, otherwise, nongovernment organizations have been put themselves into some peril. what is the distinction between those who are humanitarian versus those who have performed to the benefit of our interests and are therefore being given consideration because of the exposure that may result from that service? >> i would say the programs working in several ways to address both humanitarian concerns and those who work
presentations. we tend to work in rural areas comes i'm happy to hear about urban environment and what's going on. two questions for lives. i have recently chose to the ghostly the ghostly causa schemata was interesting is how communities are popping up across the street. somewhat ironic that are in fact there's no services out there. i'm wondering in the long term from its landing% is, communities, huge communities in areas with little resources, what is the long-term plan for these communities that do also include sort of the dwellers to vent hopes for what they want to be living. that's the first question. to bring services to them for help relocate again and how does that work? the second question -- i was sort of in knowing how you got to where you got to. i feel it in the spaghetti or is so often the government is not interested in addressing because there's so many entrenched and powerful interests. so i'm interested in knowing more about how you saw that movie forward. >> i'll answer your second question first because it's a little easier, which is included around the table with the pe
they're low you're comparing them to a pristine environment that was the wilderness but the level you're finding are lower than what we would find in most cities. >> right now, well these are wilderness lakes we should say. these lakes are anywhere from 30 kilometers or sorry, 60 miles to 60 miles away from the major source. you have to fly into the lakes typically with a helicopter or something. they're not right no the oil sand operation. what is i think important to say, if you look at our most polluted site, which is about 15 miles let's say approximately from the major operation, if you look at that, that current levels would find in a city. what is different in many cities and many areas, these pollutants, specific ones we're looking at here, hydrocarbons are decreasing. what we're seeing they're increasing and if you look at predictions just from the oil sand development people themselves, they're estimating in the next 50 years they will increase 2.5 times or 150%. if you do back of the envelope calculation if nothing else changes very soon we'll be reaching levels that are qu
of the marine environment. the have biggest brain to body weight ratio. they have the best sonar and vision. these guys are no dummies. >> reporter: orcas are led by the females, who live up to 80 years. in this case, it's believed the grandmother found an opening and led them out. it will be up to her to keep them alive, navigating a patchwork of ice for hundreds of miles in search of the open sea. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> and god speed to them. >>> and coming up next here, can you guess why this song could save you from a car crash? ♪ hold me closer tiny dancer th l. aid it. how did i know? well, i didn't really. see, i figured low testosterone would decrease my sex drive... but when i started losing energy and became moody... that's when i had an honest conversation with my doctor. we discussed all the symptoms... then he gave me some blood tests. showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number -- not just me. [ male announcer ] today, men with low t have androgel 1.62% (testosterone gel). the #1 prescribed topical testosterone replacement therapy, incre
and suing each other? >> yeah, not suing each other, but in a very, messy policy environment, and i just want to add one thing to this, and i don't know whether we disagree on this, but you see this more and more frequently that the administration, precisely because it knows that congress won't do anything, makes policy by official announcements of law enforcement, so we're going to have our own de facto dream act which congress refuses to enact by administrative law enforcement. that's very clear example of the dynamics here. you might see the same thing in drug enforcement, not going to enforce it, period, because congress won't enact a law to that effect. i find that sort of to go much beyond the ordinary exercise of administrative and executive discretion in law enforcement. it's policymaking by law enforcement which is to my mind a very, very -- in the teeth of congressional statutes to the contrary, i there are real policy difficulties with that, but there are also real constitutional problems with that. it's just sort of one more sign off dysfunction. >> not the way things are sup
environment as increased use of natural gas has reduced co2 emissions in the united states to 1992 levels. since 1990, the industry has invested more than $252 billion in improving environmental performance of our product, our facilities, and operations. between 2000, and 2010 the amount of investment and technology to reduce greenhouse gases was $71 billion. compare that to the $43 billion spent by the federal government over that same time. compared to all other industries combined which were just slightly larger than our industry invest the. refinery invested have invested more than $127 billion since 1990 to produce cleaner fuels and meet the growing of variety of state and federal mandates. the complete transition to tier two gasoline is estimated to have resulted in the reduction of tail pipe emissions by cars and light duty strucks, the -- trucks, the equivalent of taking 164 million cars off the road. through increased efficiency, we are doing more with less. america uses about half as much energy today to produce a dollar of gdp than it did in 1970. america's oil and natural gas
that come with that. the stewardship of the environment. we have enormous interest of course in our own resources, our people. in fact, 40% of canada's landmass is above the 60th parallel, yet we all have roughly 100,000 of our 34 million people living there. so it is an enormous challenge, obligation, even to continue to exert the sovereignty, search and rescue. at this time of year is becoming dark 24 hours a day. you have temperatures to plummet below 50 degrees celsius. and you have opening waters and changes that are going to create a lot of challenges because more people simply are going to go there, and more countries have exerted or expressed an interest. you mentioned china. there are many others that want to be part of this council. to your question about the obligation, i think it comes back to people playing by the rules and respecting the fact that there are places when disputes arise, as is the case with canada and the united states impact on the bering sea. some of the bordering areas of the arctic. i think there is a recognition that countries that adhere to a rule of a
-absorbed liberal academic environments where they pride themselves on being forward leaning. meanwhile the kids aren't learning crap, and this is what happens. a six-year-old boy goes like this and he is suspended. we end up having to talk about it because they are unable to let boys be boys. >> you know what happens when you lean forward? >> what? >> you fall down. >> the problem with this is that if we didn't have the awful tragedy in the other school last month, it won't -- this kid wouldn't be suspended. maybe the parents would get a note going home with the kid. this is only as a result of terrible tragedy. everybody is hyper sensitive to violence. obviously it is normal to be on alert from more dangerous behavior from students. but a six-year-old doesn't have the mental uh bill tee to -- ability to form intent to either break a school rule or try to hurt someone. if there was a toy or injury -- i mean he literally picked up his fingers and did it. there is absolutely no reason the kid should be brandished with this danger to others from, what, six years old? >> i believe that this is not
a lot of tradition. but it will be a loud game, it will be a great environment and it should be a good show for the fans. >> second round of the season open in hawaii. the rainbow always a good sign. shot of the day, mark leashman. second shot, par 4, eighth hole. it is going, going and gone for eagle. 5 under parker. scott piercey, bogey 3. through the tournament, two rounds. he's tied for second. two back of rookie russell henley, who leads it 14-under par. that's a wrap on sports. have a great weekend, everybody. i'm larry beil. >>> coming up next, a sudden surge of activity at bay area flu clinics. is the outbreak moving into california? and the new warning for women as thieves get more and violent in an effort to steal smartphones. lecareer. how do you get from here... to here? at university of phoenix we're moving career planning forward so you can start figuring that out sooner. ln fact, by thinking about where want your education to lead, while you're still in school, you might find the best route... leads somewhere you weren't even looking. let's get to work. >> the centers fo
problem or not. they get very upset because they don't. they have been destroyed by our food environment. i think these studies will come together and show that we have a couple addictive things, just like cigarettes. which sounded crazy a long time ago that people would say junk food would be linked, parallel to the tobacco court rulings. but, you know what, we're going to get there. i'm sure of it. >> well, you know, be prepared to hear from the corn refiners association. >> soda pop industry, come at me, too. tell me you're not selling complete poison. some nutritional value in pepsi. something in orange soda adds value to our diets and our body. don't look at me. what's wrong with you? >> let's all go out after the show and have some twizlers and talk this through. >> these are the things we have been eating for decades and drinking for decades and then we have an obesity crisis and we can't make the link? >> it's very possible the science will take us there. we do know where the science is for sure which is a diet on whole fresh fruits and vegetables primarily with small amounts of
to their environment, office furniture, software needed -- which nevwhenever thy to support the core for environment. at that time i was hired with the company. i was working seven days a week nonstop as all over corporations were installing $15 million systems like you would go out and buy a pack of gum. i think taxation against large corporations is what is part of our problem in this country right now. i believe if we would give them an incentive to be able to do that got onhighere and penalizing them for being successful, i think we would have a lot better environment economically. basically this all ties to the tax deductions that everyone is looking at, and i heard rumblings of a simple tax. well, we're not in a position right now to offer that. it sounds like a great idea, but something that would have to evolve over time. my point i am trying to make on the obama care thing, and i did not mention that, but i feel it they had a corporate tax, not a loophole, but basically a did nation tax, corporations could do a fund that would support a medical plan and the country, we would not have the co
and one is to mr. dove -- when no one of your main arguments is that it's a good environment for negotiations of a similar situation, describing 2004. now, i want to know in light of all the -- that we have heard the government perceived by the taliban and the u.s. is pulling for the americans why would you say that the americans -- to talabani's in a situation -- [inaudible] could you please elaborate more and the other question is that in passing i heard something about india and iran. i would like to hear some more on that to see whether iran and india together or individually have any role in the play as you'll discuss. thank you very much. >> hi, katie from the department of state. you kind of reference the growth of ttp to the lack of support received by the pakistani civilian law-enforcement bodies. i wanted to see if you could kindly clarify whether the support you are looking for there was financial or domestic, political will and why do you think that support is provided to you? >> the gentleman behind. >> hi. i'm with the u.s. -- religious freedom. the role of reli
environment. they have the biggest brain to body weight ratio. these guys are no dummies. >> reporter: orcas are led by the females, who live up to 80 years. in this case, it's believed the grandmother found an opening and led them out. it will be up to her to keep them alive. navigating a patch work of ice for hundreds of miles in search of the open sea. neal karlinsky, abc news, seattle. >> hundreds of miles, but they can only travel one mile without -- and then they need a breath. so how does that work out? >> i'm no marine biologist, but the odds don't sound good they can survive, unless that ice melts more quickly than people are expecting right now. so you don't know how many of them there are or what other holes they can find or ice thin enough to pop through and get air. but the eyes of the world are watching that situation there. hopefully they're okay. but that plane flew over and no sign. so we'll keep you posted on that. >>> coming up, the high profile snub at the oscars. >>> but first, sizzling success for a cool industry, cashing in on a climate meltdown. you're watching "world
to come and learn and fire at east atrocious weapons, but do it in a safe, you know, environment, and the most important thing that would start a buy log between the gun owners and the first responders or the people that actually have been in combat, and the big thing about that, i think it will alleviate a big problem, which is the mistrust of these gun owners of law enforcement. so you put them together -- >> stephanie: yeah. >> caller: they will see that the cops aren't nazis coming to get their guns but they will start a buy log -- >> stephanie: maybe they can have a dialogue about what it looks like to walk into a grade school and see what they have to see -- >> caller: exactly. that's what i mean. it's like you can go and -- i -- i don't hunt, but i like skeet shooting. i have been to, you know firing ranges. but if you put them together you lower the paranoia you lower the rhetoric. you lower the insane debate. >> stephanie: yeah that's what i don't get. right-wingers are all law and order until the police have a thought. >> but you are assuming ev
is to continue to keep people at home in an environment that they feel most comfortable with as opposed to an institution. so we measure in our organization readmission rates. i mentioned that we've reduced 26% readmission rates. the goal there is to continue to encourage people to stay home and be able to take care of them at home. that helps with that waste in that regard. the ability to not have duplicated diagnostic services are an example of that. and someone overlooking the whole individual has that observation as opposed to the silos. >> but we go back to the medicare for a second? >> uh-huh. >> where is that waste, and what have you seen as an organization the waste being and how would you suggest that that be tackled? >> okay. um, the waste is across the platform. i mean, i think if you this week there was an article in "the new york times" around fraud and some of the activities that are going on in that area. so fraud's a component of that. but for us as an organization the largest waste is the lack of integrated care. and what that means is duplication of services and where
hills was the hud secretary in 1975. so it's been a long journey, and i think given today's environment, given that, again, 42% of our population is diverse, we should have a cabinet that looks like america. >> so every administration doesn't have enough diversity in it. >> i'm kind of quite surprised at that because with this president with his particular history and given all the campaign rhetoric about diversity and the female voter. >> let me bring up what the president's spokesperson said, jay carney. he said the president is choosing the best candidate available for the job. >> i'm shocked at that statement. you know, that's kind of a statement that was an excuse that was commonly used 20, 25 years ago. we're not talking about special treatment. we're talking about going out and finding the most qualified people where over 50% of the population are women, and we have tens of millions of americans who are people of color. >> so your message to the president is? >> i think he can do better. with every administration. regardless of which administration it is. we hope that we have a m
car, try to save gas and help the environment and they'll still tax you. you really can't make this stuff up. we'll deal with it next and look at this quote. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want when you need it. it's anothereason more investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. nothing. are you stealing our daughter's school supplies and taking them to work? no, i was just looking for my stapler and my... this thing. i save money by using fedex ground and buy my own supplies. that's a great idea. i'm going to go... we got clients in today. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping at fedex office. [ male announcer ] save on ground shipping you know it can be hard to lbreathe, and how that feels.e, copd includes chronic bronchitis and emphy
prizes, al gore got a nobel peace prize for the environment because he opposed george bush. i mean, you win these prizes for political reasons not for actually be the recipient of a valid prize. >> that's true, but in a case like this, people's reactions are going to be huh? say what? >> there you go. >> make it somebody that people don't have mouths agape when you declare who it is. stuart: we wanted charles to have opinion on this, charles payne, he was supposed to be here. where is he, any idea where charles is? ah, he was on the fox news channel, wait a second. do i hear the man? yes, charles, enter. charles: can i come in. >> yea, welcome. stuart: you've got a mic on. charles: i do a have mic on. stuart: 20 seconds to tell me your opinion of bill clinton father of the year. charles: i don't like the awards going to the big name guys. there's fathers out there working two jobs, going to school, struggling. tired of these guys, celebrity culture we live in, got to be bill clinton one year, and bloomberg the next year, forget about it, i don't want to hear about these guys. i want the
environment. there are still plenty of people who think the debt ceiling issues could be a debacle. february 15th, a little earlier than expected, a lot of people floating ideas that moody's might downgrade the u.s. debt sometime this quarter, if there's no grand bargain that ever appears, and that looks increasingly unlikely. i'm in the camp that the risk is to the down side on the stock market right now. earnings today, as you just mentioned here, look, the question has been whether or not putry was the trough in earnings that things would get better from here. it's going to be modest improvement. q4 isn't looking that great. we're only looking at roughly 3% improvement in earnings. that's not great. top line growth has been nonexistent throughout last year. q3 top line growth was zero. zero. we haven't seen that in a long time. you want to know how weird that is? the ten-year eenaverage is 7%. maybe it will be 3%. that's the hope. it's coming down as we're going in. so we may be at a trough in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter certainly isn't going to be gangbusters right now here
something like libya, chaos, bad acting, all things of -- all kinds of things can happen in that environment. host: early in this conflict, you and others wrote about the family dynamics in the the assad family. his mother is still alive, and by many accounts, calling the shots behind the scenes. can you elaborate? guest: i have not heard that. it is a family affair. his father ruled syria for many years pdt killed 30,000 syrians in putting in -- for many years. he killed 30,000 syrians. the security forces have held tight around him. his mother calling the shots -- i'm not aware of that. host: one of our viewers saying i would prefer the position of switzerland. no one seems interested in blowing up their cities. a position that continues to percolate -- a position that continues to percolate in this country. est: people who read -- our leaders read it such. they go into a full retrenchment, retreat view. world is a very chaotic place right now. you have a people associated with the arab spring. you have the euro crisis. you have a global recession. you have a rising china. it is a very a
of a stable political system, by improved institutional environment, land rights, rule of law, judicial reform. none of this changes are going to happen overnight. and it's very hard for people in mr. mudd answer to elected officials or have to answer to boards of directors who are saying, show me the results. it's very hard for us to come to terms with the fact that the engagement of habitat for humanity for 27 years in haiti may actually be a really brief moment of time, not a long moment of time. but we need to begin to highlight the time of dimension what is happening. and that links to another theme which came through, throughout the proceedings today. we need to try to develop appropriate untenable standards of success. are the 10,000 homes and 55,000, people housed in a project that eric talked about, is that an accomplishment? yes, it is an encouragement but it's not necessarily, it doesn't seem like anacondas but if you talk about 2 million displaced people. like time when we think about what we mean by success, we have to operate at several different levels, and we can't find ourselv
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)